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Royal Engineers TA

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The TA Royal Engineers

The part-time element of the Royal Engineers.

TA Units

Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia)

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The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia) (R MON RE(M)) is the most senior regiment in the British Territorial Army, having given continuous loyal service to the crown since 1539.

It is not the oldest regiment in the British Army; this honour goes to the Honourable Artillery Company (from 1296 but chartered in 1537), but Militia always takes precedence over Volunteers, although The Jersey Field Squadron (M) can trace its origins back to 1337.

The regiment is also unusual in having the word Royal appear twice in its name. It gained the first "Royal" in 1804 when it was known as the Monmouth and Brecon Militia. The second was acquired in 1877 when the regiment transferred into a Special Reserve section of the expanding Royal Engineers. The regiment is also the only Royal Engineer regiment to possess colours because in 1914 they were given the colours of the East Monmouth Militia for safekeeping.

The unit is located in the following places:

RHQ - Monmouth

100 Fd Sqn - Cwmbran

108 Fd Sqn - Swansea

225 Fd Sqn - Oldbury

Jersey Fd Sqn - St Helier

In the last six years the Regiment has provided composite units for service in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Originally a militia (infantry) unit charged with home defence, if became an Engineer unit in 1877 and a Royal Engineer unit in 1896. From 1896 it is also became the only regiment with two "Royals" in it's title and is the only Royal Engineer unit whose members wear the Prince of Wales Division cap badge and the militia flash instead of a Brigade affiliation.

RHQ

The majority of the Regiment is located in Wales with its Regimental Headquarters (RHQ) based in the remaining grounds of Monmouth Castle itself and it's supporting Troop located in Vauxhall Camp (also in Monmouth).

100 Fd Sqn

100 Field Squadron has it's headquarters and No 1 Troop in Cwmbran with its two other Troops (2 and 3) being found in Llandaff, Cardiff and Whiteladies, Bristol.

108 Fd Sqn

108 Field Squadron is located close to the Swansea city centre and its one Troop is located in Gorseinon on the outskirts of Swansea.

225 Fd Sqn

225 Field Squadron is located in Oldbury, Birmingham and it has recently taken over a new Troop location in Walsall, Birmingham.

The Jersey Field Squadron RE (M)

The unit's primary role is to provide a Contingency Component (CC) of trained and deployable manpower to the Regular Army in order to support Large Scale Deliberate Intervention (LSDI) operations. This is something the unit has continued to do since 2002 with a Squadron sized deployment (the only deployment of a formed unit by the TA since the Korean war) of approximately 128 personnel on OP TELIC 2 and a formed Troop of 48 personnel to support 21 Engineer Regiment in 2007 on OP TELIC 11. Individuals still volunteer for operations and the regiment has deployed personnel to the following locations in the last two years: Iraq, Afghanistan, Canada, Kuwait, Germany, the Balkans, Kenya and Malawi.

Museum - http://www.monmouthcastlemuseum.org.uk/

71 Engineer Regiment

72 Engineer Regiment

72 (Tyne Electrical Engineers) Engineer Regiment (Volunteers) reformed in 2006 as a Close Support Royal Engineer Regiment.

The unit is located in the following places:

103 Field Squadron - Newcastle and Sunderland.

106 Field Squadron - Sheffield and Bradford.

299 Para Squadron - Wakefield and Hull.

Close Support Engineers provide specialist engineer capability to front line troops including such tasks as Demolitions, Bridging, Construction, Water Supply, Field Engineering and Counter Mobility.

72 Engr Regt (V) is currently supporting both 23 Engineer Regiment, as part of 16 Air Assault Brigade, and 21 Engineer Regiment, providing the opportunity for challenging and rewarding operational deployments in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

As well as training as a Close Support Engineer, members of the Regiment have the opportunity to train to join 299 Para Sqn RE (V), the only Royal Engineer parachute role Squadron. 'The maroon beret', the distinctive hallmark of Parachute trained troops, is worn by members of 299 Para Sqn (RE), recognising those who have completed the gruelling and physically demanding tests of endurance.

299 Parachute Squadron RE

299 Parachute Squadron is the Territorial Army's elite Airborne Engineer Squadron located in Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

Association - http://www.299association.com/

73 Engineer Regiment

75 Engineer Regiment

101 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) RE(V)

131 Independent Commando Squadron RE

Provides general engineering support to 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines.

First raised in 1947 as an Airborne Engineer Regiment, it once fielded over 1000 trained parachute engineers. Since 1978 the unit has been an independent Squadron of Commandos providing engineer support to the Royal Marines.

As a Commando unit the majority of personnel have completed the TA All Arms Commando Course, run by the Royal Marines at Lympstone. This demanding course is the foundation for all further training.

As an engineer unit the Squadron trains for a variety of tasks from demolitions to construction. The unit has its own chefs, clerks and mechanics to sustain personnel and equipment alike.

The unit frequently deploys on tasks with, or to support, the Regular Forces in both the UK and abroad. In recent years the Squadron deployed personnel to Iraq, Afghanistan, Oman, USA, Norway, France, Malawi, the Falkland Islands, Romania and Egypt on exercises and training with 3 Commando Brigade units.

The Squadron has worked hard to build up the reputation of a TA unit second to none, with a professional approach to part time soldiering. Its personnel have earned the respect of their Regular counterparts, with many former Regular soldiers joining the Squadron.

135 Independent Geographic Squadron RE(V)

591 Independent Field Squadron

591 Independent Field Squadron is the only Royal Engineer TA unit in Northern Ireland. The Squadron is based in Bangor, County Down with a detachment located in Antrim.

The Squadron is a Light Role, Close Support, Combat Engineer Squadron. It comprises 2 Field Troops of Combat Engineers, a Support Troop of drivers and plant operators and supporting personnel.

170 (Infra Sp) Engr Gp

170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group (170 (Infra Sp) Engr Gp) was formed in 2005 following the amalgamation of the Regular and Territorial Army (TA) elements of Military Works Force (MWF). The unit is administered centrally in Nottingham but training can be carried out at a variety of locations.

Regulars and TA work and train together and cover the full spectrum of military and civilian infrastructure support including:

Expeditionary camps - Railways - Ports - Fuel - Water - Power generation and distribution and other utilities - Airfield and geotechnical support

Group Structure The Engineer Group consists of a Headquarters and five Works Groups. Each Works Group, in addition to providing a works and military infrastructure capability specialises in a particular area:

62 Wks Gp RE - Water Utilities - water development and well drilling 63 Wks Gp RE - Electrical power - generation and distribution 64 Wks Gp RE - Fuel - fuel production and distribution 65 Wks Gp RE - Civilian infrastructure - railway and ports infrastructure 66 Wks Gp RE - Air Support and geotechnical engineering Civilian Infrastructure Expertise Within all Works Groups, the expertise in civilian infrastructure and utilities is provided by TA teams with individuals with relevant civilian knowledge, qualifications and experience, be they tradesmen, technicians, designers or professional engineers.

Applicants for the TA Component are expected to have a qualification in a branch of engineering and are likely to be working in a civilian job requiring skills that are transferable to a suitable role in the TA Component.

The Regular Component of 170 (Infra Sp) Engr Gp has a permanent presence whenever the Armed Forces are deployed on operations, our TA soldiers deploy and work alongside our Regular soldiers and in recent years they have deployed to Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan.

65 Works Group RE

Trades

  • Communications

As a Military Engineer (Command, Communications and Information Systems Specialist), working alone or as part of a team, you will be a key operative during major exercises and operational tasks, and as such will have considerable individual responsibility. You will relay vital information and so will need to have excellent powers of concentration and a real eye for detail.

  • Amphibious Engineer

The Amphibious Engineer plays a vital role in supporting the Army on exercises and operations through the operation of specialist bridging equipment. The main tool of the trade is the M3, an amphibious wheeled vehicle that can be driven straight into a river and used as a ferry, or linked with others to make a bridge. The M3 can take vehicles as heavy as the Challenger 2 tank and eight rigs can be used to cross a 100m river in 30 minutes. This fast, reliable means of crossing obstacles enables commanders on the ground to gain and maintain momentum on the battlefield.

  • Bomb Disposal

As a Military Engineer (Bomb Disposal) you will belong to a branch of the Royal Engineers that comprises highly trained specialists who provide additional support on operations and exercises around the world. You will be responsible for clearing and making safe all manner of enemy ordnance, enabling the Army to live, move and fight on the battlefield. You may also be employed in post-conflict situations where your expertise will be needed to clear areas and permit the civilian population to return to their homes.

  • Bricklayer and concreter

As a Military Engineer (Bricklayer and Concretor), many aspects of construction, including planning, setting out and laying brick work, block work, and concreting will be your responsibilities. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates, and you are likely to find yourself either improving existing buildings or facilities, or constructing new ones.

  • Building and structural finisher

As a Military Engineer (Building and Structural Finisher) the preparation of surfaces and the application of various finishes to those surfaces is your responsibility. You are likely to find yourself preparing and finishing surfaces in either existing facilities or as part of a new construction project.

  • Carpenter and joiner

As a Military Engineer (Carpenter and Joiner), many aspects of construction, including, planning, setting out and construction of timber structures using timber and fittings, will be your responsibility. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates. You are likely to find yourself either improving existing buildings or facilities, or constructing new ones.

  • Combat Engineer

Combat Engineering is engineering at the sharp end, the source of the vital support skills that allow the Royal Engineers to complete combat and construction missions in difficult conditions all over the world. On the battlefield, Combat Engineers provide the means to live, move and fight while denying the same means to the enemy. When the enemy is on the move, it’s the job of the Combat Engineer to impede his progress by creating obstacles, destroying bridges, cratering roads and laying anti-tank mines. When his own side is on the move, it’s the Combat Engineer who clears the way, building bridges and supplying basic needs such as drinking water to sustain forces in the field.

  • Driver RE

As a Military Engineer (Driver), you have the chance to work with vehicles that range from basic Land Rovers to sophisticated bridge-layers and cranes. Depending on the operational conditions, you could find yourself taking them across country at night, with minimum lighting to avoid detection by enemy forces. It’s a job that calls on all your driving skills, and you’ll also need some mechanical skills to diagnose faults and carry out basic repairs to keep your vehicle on the road.

  • Electrician

As a Military Engineer (Electrician), electrical installation work and the generation and distribution of power are your responsibilities. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field, and you are likely to find yourself either working on existing electrical installations or constructing and commissioning new ones.

  • Fabricator

As a Military Engineer (Fabricator), many aspects of construction, including the manufacture of parts and structures using all kinds of metals, are your responsibilities. The Army utilises many existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates, and you are likely to find yourself either improving existing buildings or facilities or constructing new ones.

  • Fitter - Air conditioning and refrigeration

As a Military Engineer (Fitter Air Conditioning and Refrigeration), the installation, operation and maintenance of in-service and civilian static refrigeration, ventilation and air conditioning equipment is your responsibility. You are likely to work on either existing systems or constructing and commissioning new ones, in either permanent or temporary facilities.

  • Fitter - General

As a Fitter General Equipment Mechanic, servicing, maintaining and repairing some of the Army’s huge range of mechanical equipment are your responsibilities. You will become well versed in all engineering workshop practices and have a working knowledge of petrol and diesel engines, generators, pumps and vehicle/plant transmission systems. In short, there’s very little an Equipment Mechanic won’t be able to do after training, and their skills are vital for a huge range of military engineering projects.

  • Geographic Technician

Geographic Technicians operate within the Geographic Service of the Royal Engineers. It’s a highly specialised branch, whose work ranges from the collection of geographic data using satellite navigation systems to the production of conventional maps overprinted with tactical information, and the operation of sophisticated workstations capable of providing commanders with a 3D visualisation of the battlefield. Using specialist measuring instruments and computer software, Geographic Technicians collect and compile information from measurements taken in the field, and from satellite imagery and aerial photography. The job also involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other databases.

  • Heating and plumbing

As a Military Engineer (Heating and Plumbing), the assembly, installation, maintenance and repair of heating and plumbing systems is your responsibility. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates, and you are likely to find yourself either working on existing heating and plumbing installations or constructing and commissioning new ones.

  • Plant operator mechanic

As a Military Engineer (Plant Operator Mechanic), the operation of earthmoving and construction vehicles (plant) are your responsibilities. The Royal Engineers use a wide variety of both civilian and specialised military equipment, and you are likely to find yourself operating and maintaining this equipment to the highest standards to support military construction and other operations worldwide.

  • Resources specialist

The responsibility of the RE Resources Specialist is to ensure that, whatever stores and equipment are needed by the Royal Engineers to carry out its combat and construction roles, they arrive in the right place, in the right quantity and at the right time. By using the very latest computer systems from base to battlefield, Resources Specialists can forecast the amount of usage and predict demand, and are essential to the successful completion of the RE's operational and development work throughout the world. You will obtain and issue the wide range of materials and equipment these projects require.

  • Specialist

Military Engineer (Specialists) belong to 170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group, a branch of the Royal Engineers comprised of already highly qualified Chartered Engineers, Technicians and Artisans, who can provide additional support on operations and exercises worldwide when required.

  • Design

As a Military Engineer Design you are responsible for the provision of advice and support to a variety of engineering tasks. The Army carries out construction tasks in a variety of dispersed locations and you are likely to find yourself being critical to the success of such tasks.

  • Design draftsman

As a Military Engineer (Design Draughtsman), taking design information and producing and maintaining engineering drawings to facilitate construction is your responsibility. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates. You are likely to find yourself either producing drawings of existing facilities or plans for new ones, even assisting in design work on occasion.

  • Draughtsman electrical and mechanical

As a Military Engineer (Draughtsman Electrical and Mechanical), taking design information and producing and maintaining electrical and mechanical engineering drawings to facilitate construction is your responsibility. The Army utilises existing facilities, as well as constructing modern bases in the field wherever it operates. You are likely to find yourself either producing electrical and mechanical drawings of existing facilities or plans for new ones, and even assisting in design work on occasion.

  • Surveying engineer

As a Military Engineer (Surveyor Engineering), the collection of survey data, advising on it, assisting in design work and controlling line and level during construction is your responsibility. The Army carries out engineering tasks in the field wherever it operates and you are likely to find yourself working in varied and challenging environments collecting and working with survey data.

Phase 2 Training

Further Courses

Promotion

External Links

Official Army site - http://www.army.mod.uk/royalengineers/units/11593.aspx

RE Museum - http://www.remuseum.org.uk/

RE Association - http://www.reahq.org.uk/

RE Insitution - http://www.instre.org/

RE Reunited - http://www.engineers-reunited.co.uk/