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Brufen

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Headache? Bullet wound? Cancer? Here's your cure!

Brufen is a wonder drug capable of defeating any medical condition known to man, and probably some that we aren't aware of. Yet. Also known as 'Combat Smarties'.

How does it work?

Brufen tablets contain the active ingredient ibuprofen, which is a type of medicine called a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This means it reduces swelling without making you fail CDT. Good eh?

Ibuprofen works by blocking the action of a substance in the body called cyclo-oxygenase (COX). Cyclo-oxygenase is involved in the production of various chemicals in the body, some of which are known as prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are produced in response to injury and certain diseases and conditions, and cause pain, swelling and inflammation. NSAIDs block the production of these prostaglandins and are therefore effective at reducing inflammation and pain. Note that its properties in defeating broken legs, bullet wounds and skull damage are slightly less clear.

Ibuprofen also reduces fever by reducing the production of prostaglandins. Fever is associated with an increase in prostaglandins in the brain, and these prostaglandins cause the body temperature to increase. By reducing prostaglandins in the brain, ibuprofen lowers body temperature and hence reduces fever.

Ibuprofen reduces inflammation and related pain and so can be used to relieve muscular and rheumatic aches and pains. It can also be used to relieve other painful conditions such as headaches, migraine, toothache, nerve pain (neuralgia) and period pain. It is also useful for reducing fever, and Brufen syrup can be used for reducing fever in children.

Brufen retard tablets are sustained-release tablets. They are designed to release the ibuprofen slowly and continuously over a few hours to provide prolonged pain relief. These tablets must be swallowed whole to avoid damaging the sustained-release action.

So that's all well and good. Still unclear why it is prescribed for absolutely everything, however.

Sponsors of the Commissioning Course at Sandhurst - allegedly.