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Leet

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Leet (or 1337, l33t, l33+ etc) is a linguistic phenomenon associated with the underground culture centred on telecommunications, manifested primarily on the Internet.

Leet can be defined as the corruption or modification of written text. For example, the term "leet" itself is often written "l33t" or "1337". Such corruptions are frequently referred to as "Leetspeak" or "13375p34k," etc. (see below for cipher definitions).

In addition to corruption of standard language, new colloquialisms have been added to the parlance. It is also important to note that Leet itself is not solely based upon one language or character set. In fact, Greek, Russian, Chinese, and other languages have been subjected to the Leet "cipher". As such, while it may be referred to as a "cipher", a "dialect", or a "language", Leet does not fit squarely into any of these categories.

The name Leet itself is derived from the word elite (also 31337). Elite has been used in the past to designate a group of users as belonging to a higher social echelon than other users. Originally, "elite" had been reduced to one syllable, "'leet".

Because of this derivation from the word "elite", calling someone or something "leet" is considered a compliment and has basically the same connotations as saying that the subject is "excellent".

Thus it would be correct to say 'Darth_Doctrinus is leet' or indeed '1337'.

The cipher itself is highly dynamic, and subject to stylistic interpretation. A simple list of transliterations follows:

A B C D E * F G H I * J K L * M N O P Q R * S T * U V W X Y Z *
4
/\
@
/-\
^
aye
∂
8
13
|3
ß
P>
|:
 !3
(3
/3
)3
|-]
[
¢
<
(
©
)
|)
(|
|o
[)
I>
|>
 ?
T)
I7
cl
3
&
£
€
ë 
[-
|=-
|=
Æ’
|#
ph
/=
6
&
(_+
9
C-
gee
(γ,
[,
{,
<-
(.
#
/-/
[-]
]-[
)-(
(-)
 :-:
|~|
|-|
]~[
}{
 ?
}-{
1
 !
¡
|
eye
3y3
][
]
_|
_/
¿
</
(/
X
|<
|{
]{
|X
1
£
7
1_
|
|_
|v|
[V]
{V}
em
AA
|\/|
/\/\
(u)
(V)
(\/)
/|\
^^
/|/|
//\
|\|\
^/
|\|
/\/
[\]
<\>
{\}
[]\
// []
/V
₪
^
0
()
oh
[]
p
|*
|o
|º
 ?
|^(o)
|>
|"
9
[]D
|ÌŠ
|7
(_,)
()_
0_
<|
|`
|~
|?
/2
|^
lz
|9
2
®
[z
Я

5
$
z
§
ehs
es
7
+
-|-
1
']['
â€
(_)
|_|
v
L|
µ
\/
|/
\|
\/\/
vv
\N
'//
\\'
\^/
dubya
(n)
\V/
\X/
\|/
\_|_/
\_:_/
Ш
uu
><
Ж
}{
ecks
×
χ
)(
][
}{
j
`/
Ч
7
\|/
2
7_
-/_
 %
>_
* Note the use of 7 for either L, T, or Y; the use of 2 for either R or Z; the use of £ for either E or L; the use of 9 for either G or P; and the use of 1 for either I, L, or T. the Position of ~ may change depending on the font

J, Q, and Y typically are not transliterated and are often used as themselves. There are some common Leet alternatives for other sounds, e.g. "ck" is often replaced with an "x" (based on the Greek letter Chi as in "hax0r" and "sux0rs" (hacker and sucks/suckers).

Sometimes an "-0r" is added in place of "-er".

It goes without saying that anyone who uses '13375p34k' probably needs to go outside more, do some PT and generally live life a little more.

See also AYBABTU. Bold text